• Login:

Welcome to the Acer Tablet forum.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
Like Tree6Likes

Thread: Multitasking operation and Performance?

  1. #1
    Iconia Informant
    Member #
    5990
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Payson AZ
    Posts
    35
    Liked
    5 times

    Multitasking operation and Performance?

    Can I listen to music whily playing a game or surfing?
    This A500 seems to want do only one thing at a time.

    John
    bestvendor_2 likes this.

  2. #2
    Iconia Lurker
    Member #
    8259
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4
    Liked
    0 times
    Hhhmmmm mine can get a lil fussy at times but I can multi-task just fine usually.Perhaps a reboot at least once a day.or a task killer to kill the 500 hundred apps running in the background,lol.also at least a gb or ram free,and finally I always turn off background data,that's really important(I think) btw I'm rooted with android 3.1

  3. #3
    Administrator
    Member #
    5133
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania, US
    Posts
    2,970
    Liked
    178 times
    Just went from repliying to this forum on tapatalk, to going to this forum on the browser (I use Maxthon btw), to starting a pool game and back on tapatalk again with no issues. Whatever game you play have to be able to mute the sound though.

    -end of line-
    Welcome To AcerTabletForum
    Please feel free to PM me if you need any help

  4. #4
    Super Moderator
    Member #
    1373
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    764
    Liked
    55 times
    A while back I started having some 'buggy' issues, and I noticed I couldn't multi-task as usual. I didn't think much of it for several days, but performance steadily degraded. Then I read a post by RobKort about Lookout Ad Detector (?) and loaded/ran that, and found several apps I RARELY used were running 3, sometimes 4 trackers, so I went through and rid myself of nearly a dozen different apps, only keeping the ones I truly rely upon. BOOM! Performance bounced right back to snappy...now I'm wary about the free crap I download..it better be worth it now, to stay on my machines!

  5. #5
    Administrator
    Member #
    5133
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania, US
    Posts
    2,970
    Liked
    178 times
    Hmm, that is very interesting Alpha. Never thought of it cause I use that app all the time. I thinking of pinning this thread for future reference. Maybe adding "and performance" to the title.

    Edit/done..

    -end of line-
    Welcome To AcerTabletForum
    Please feel free to PM me if you need any help

  6. #6
    Iconia Informant
    Member #
    2530
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    75
    Liked
    2 times
    I also noticed this from my tablet. Performance was getting worse and so I used Lookout Ad Detector and uninstalled quite a lot of apps. Tablet seems to be in better shape. It wasn't until I uninstalled Dungeon Hunter 3 and Real Football 2012 that things seemed to run better. Both apps are incessant in their push notifications.

  7. #7
    Iconia Operative
    Member #
    10191
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Coruscant
    Posts
    293
    Liked
    12 times
    Quote Originally Posted by jobek View Post
    Can I listen to music whily playing a game or surfing?
    This A500 seems to want do only one thing at a time.

    John
    jobex what version are you running, if its Honeycomb no wonder as Ice Cream Sandwich has wayy better multitasking(for me anyways)
    Woe to those poor souls that know neither victory nor defeat, those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight. -Theodore Roosevelt

    Moral: Nothing ventured in life, nothing gained!




    Acer Iconia A500


    Twitter - #LordZilo

  8. #8
    Rescue Squad
    Member #
    10547
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    761
    Liked
    135 times

    Understanding and Managing CPU Usage is Important to Overall System Performance

    The a500 is very effective at multitasking, as long as you don't let apps waste resources in the background for no good reason. The key to good a500 performance then in most cases is simply not letting problematic apps waste CPU.

    I've run a number of tests to analyze this condition, and can share a little information that you may find interesting and hopefully useful. I'll try to keep this brief (which is extremely difficult for me, so please bear with if I am not successful...).

    In answer to the question at the top of this post: Media player apps use the mediaserver process to stream music through the audio codec chip. That chip does most of the work of decoding the stream, so when you play music, the mediaserver process only uses about 5% of the total available a500 CPU. The work that mediaserver does is apparently little more than reading the file from storage and streaming it to the audio codec chip. (My test was performed using a file from internal storage, so it seems possible that an external SD card may actually use less CPU, by avoiding the overhead imposed by the internal FUSE filesystem. I understand that when you read an SD card, more of that type of work is apparently done by the onboard controller, but I have not tested this and do not know what the actual driver costs are for that.) If all you happen to be doing is playing music, the a500 CPU cores throttle down to ~21-30% of top speed to save power. If you happen to be monitoring when this happens, you can see mediaserver CPU usage hover around 15-18% -- which is still equivalent to ~5% of the total CPU resource available relative to the 1Ghz ceiling. That leaves you 95% remaining for anything else you want to do.

    When you run browsers and many other types of similar text style apps, it is not unusual for most of the work to be done when you first open the app, which is one major reason that app killers are bad. At app startup, the system CPU cores will spool up to 100% power, and usage by the starting process will jump to ~75%, 90% or more for a few seconds, and then fall back down. When you load new pages, again, a brief jump over 30-50%, sometimes higher when all of the major content streams in, and then back down to near 0. Certain types of games and elaborate 3D graphics apps will naturally use more CPU throughout run times.

    The Netflix app uses about 15-20% CPU while streaming at the highest resolution. Most of that actually tends to be seen in mediaserver CPU usage. The heavy work is again being done in the other hardware, not the CPU cores.

    Now here's where I'm going with this. The a500 CPU spends most of the time idling, which happens to be what you want -- so it snaps into action when you touch the screen. Most of the real productive tasks you do tend to use CPU resources only for a relatively short interval of time, and then the system just rests while waiting for you to do something else. So why do users report having performance issues? Answer: Mostly because there are some apps out there that hog CPU in the background. There can be other problems like bad internet service, defective routers, etc., and even an occasional a500 hardware problem or compatibility issue, but most problems are caused by misbehaving apps consuming CPU in the background. I have heard of just one confirmed severe memory leak in a popular app, where it was apparently leaking so bad, and as a widget it kept hanging around in the foreground, that it consumed most of the available ram until killed. Severe memory leaks are relatively rare compared to CPU hogs though.

    Measuring CPU performance:
    (It's the most important thing for users to manage... OK, maybe second most important after you avoid overfilling the /sdcard filesytem.)
    What I have found is that I only see performance problems when some app is acting up. The best way to find offending apps is by using some method to monitor CPU usage. I use shell commands for controlled testing, and a couple of very nice GUI-based performance monitoring apps for quick checks and real-time monitoring. OS Monitor (Tablet version) is one of my favorite tools, but some of the details are somewhat technical for typical users, and may be a bit confusing and pointless for general use. (For example, it shows CPU broken down into system and user time, number of threads, etc.) Watchdog Task Manager Lite (by Zomut, LLC) is the other tool I use, and in my opinion, this is a tool that most users should have on their Android systems.

    Watchdog monitors background CPU usage for you, and tells you if there is a problem:
    Watchdog is an app that should come packaged with every Android device. This is not a sales pitch. I do not know the authors, but I have to say that this is a very useful tool. It does not require technical knowledge of the OS or hardware to be used. It can be installed and used for its basic role by anyone. What it does is monitor apps that are not in the foreground -- i.e., it monitors apps that have been used and then parked in memory when the user has pushed the Android "up" buttton, or otherwise selected focus for another app. By default, it alarms when any background app exceeds 40% of CPU. It does not alert on foreground app usage, because no such alerting is necessary. This is because you want any app that you are using in the foreground to have full access to all the CPU it can get, so you don't have to wait on it. If a foreground app runs slow, you can clearly see that, and so do not need an alert. You just don't want the system to run slow because some poorly implemented app is sucking CPU in the background for no good reason. That's what Watchdog monitors for you. When it alerts on an app, that app has been bad, and you need to determine what you want to do with it -- e.g., either remove it, or workaround the problem somehow.

    Vampire browsers:
    Of the apps I've used, the background CPU vampires tend to be browsers, and specifically, Dolphin (above 80% at times) , the stock Android Browser, and the Android Browser derivative, ICS Browser (both slurping ~30% CPU in the background). These three browsers tend to use more CPU in the background than in the foreground! They should not be using CPU in the background at all. I suspect there are other bad browsers (in this respect), but these three are the only ones I have seen with this problem so far. I have only tested about half a dozen browsers.

    The test is done by opening 4-5 tabs on various pages with dynamic content -- e.g., ads, etc. -- and then parking the browser in the background with the Android "up" button. You then simply monitor per-process CPU usage with a tool such as Watchdog.

    There are many apps available, so it seems likely that some number of apps other than browsers can cause this problem also, but I just have not found any yet. I have not looked very hard though either. The browser problems I note here can be very severe, and even hang the system. It's hard to believe it until you see the measurements firsthand. Seeing such problematic browsers gave me a little more insight into why some app killer processes are so popular. I still advise against using any app killers though. Memory based app killers merely take shots in the dark, and occasionally hit a background CPU hog by accident. It's much more valuable to understand what is misusing resources, so you can deal with the problem more effectively.

    Of the browsers I have tested, the following do not appear to suck significant CPU in the background. (some of these have other severe problems though)
    * Opera Mobile (I really like this browser. It looks very simple on the surface, but is a serious feature-rich workhorse. It has been very stable for me so far. Use of opera:config brings up a huge array of custom settings, including the ability to provide custom UA strings.)
    * Firefox Beta (Cool, marginally customizable, but buggy and prone to crashing). Update, 7/5/12: At some point in the past 2 months, Firefox Beta was marked as incompatible with the a500 and other tablets. Firefox, Firefox Beta, Aurora (below) and the nightly build can still be downloaded directly from here: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Mobile/Plat...m_Requirements.
    * Aurora (Mozilla Firefox pre-beta product... between nightly and beta.)
    * Chrome Beta (some nice features, but crashes so horribly that I had to remove it. It kept locking up the whole system, causing a complete Android system crash for me several times. One second I'm browsing, the the tab contents all turn white, the controls lock up, and vrrrrrrr, the tablet is vibrating and rebooting.)

    To prevent the background CPU waste problem with the stock Android browser, I simply close all tabs until it exits.

    For Dolphin exiting the browser completely works to prevent the CPU waste. I actually removed Dolphin though, because it has become more unstable lately, and I discovered it was also busy using the network in the background when I had not even run it. It was generating a number of DNS lookup and IP connection errors in the system log. I'm enjoying the relative stability and flexible power of Opera Mobile, and am not really missing Dolphin much.

    The ad provider monitoring tool mentioned above (Ad Detector Network) is very handy. It's a good app. I use it because I'm paranoid though and not because I suspect a relationship between ad providers and system performance (background or foreground). I could not find any empirical evidence to prove that any ad providers were a cause of any performance issues. Apps don't download ads unless they are being run. If an app is waking up to get ads in the background, then it's just a poorly implemented app, and CPU monitoring will find it if the associated usage was significant. I have redirected ad domain names though for some providers in my DNS server to an internal web service on one of my Linux servers, not because the ads were causing performance problems, but because they were crashing some apps that I was using (weatherbug, for example). I have noticed that the libraries for these providers appear buggy, causing java exceptions, etc. If you have some ad supported apps that close unexpectedly, especially when ads try to update, look for java exceptions in the system logs.

    I'm a little concerned that assigning blame for performance issues to apps that use ad providers may not be valid or even fair in general. I find the ad supported app market to be a very good thing. There are numerous apps that I use only occasionally, and prefer not to shell out cash for such a purpose. The ads are typically not a significant intrusion on a 10" tablet. I really like the option of being able to use some apps for the cost of reading an occasional ad, and paying for apps I like more. I find the overall market solution to be ingenious, and very beneficial to the Android user population overall.

    I did not test any of the Tegra-tuned games yet, as I am sure that these tax resources considerably, by design, and may not leave much CPU left over. I'm just too lazy to load any up now and test. That's really beyond the topic I was trying to address here anyway.

    In summary. Use an app like Watchdog to monitor your CPU usage, and you will experience much better system performance overall. You do not have to root or reflash your a500 to enjoy very crisp performance. If you do choose the alternate ROM route though, this topic is still just as relevant.
    Last edited by Mrhelper; 09-02-2012 at 05:11 PM. Reason: typos, new info, specify Watchdog
    alphawave7 and UltraDroid like this.

  9. #9
    Iconia Informant
    Member #
    5998
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Richmond Virginia USA
    Posts
    60
    Liked
    1 times
    This long message from MrHelper was very useful. However, he did not identify which Watchdog app he is talking about. I searched for Watchdog and it came up with a dozen or so! Can someone identify the correct Watchdog, please.

    Thanks,
    Bill

  10. #10
    Rescue Squad
    Member #
    10547
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    761
    Liked
    135 times
    Quote Originally Posted by BillW View Post
    This long message from MrHelper was very useful. However, he did not identify which Watchdog app he is talking about. I searched for Watchdog and it came up with a dozen or so! Can someone identify the correct Watchdog, please.

    Thanks,
    Bill
    Sorry about the oversight, and thanks for pointing it out. I don't recall there being so many when I wrote that post, but I should have been more specific anyway.

    This is the one:
    Watchdog Task Manager Lite (by Zomut, LLC)
    Last edited by Mrhelper; 09-02-2012 at 05:17 PM.


 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

acer a500

,

acer a500 android browsing and listening music

,

acer a500 listening music at the same time as web surfing

,

acer iconia a500 getting rid

,

acer tablet multitasking

,
how to close background apps on acer tablet
,

how to close multitasking on acer tablet

,

how to get rid of apps on multitasking for acer iconia tab a500

,

how to get rid of pages on acer tablet

,

how to mulittask on acer tablet

,

how to multitask on acer iconia

,

multitasking on acer tablet

,

multitasking with acer tablet

,

play music while browsing a500 iconia

,

why is it not possible to listen audio while opening another site on acer tab a500

Click on a term to search our site for related topics.